This day. This is a direct response to

This is
where all the conflict up until this point is brought to a head; because Amelia
becomes obsessed by the Babadook, or rather, what the Babadook actually is. The
Babadook pushes her over that careful precipice that she has situated herself on
and, whilst its actions entirely influenced her own, she was the reason it was
that strong in the first place. From there, she lets out everything on her
child, her hatred, her sadness and her bitterness that he wasn’t the one who
died in the car accident that fateful day. This is a direct response to not
only the Babadook’s possession, but also of her own inner turmoil that she has
been feeling for months.

 

During the
confrontation scene where the possessed Amelia threatens to kill Sam, Sam uses
all of his tricks in order to attack and later restrain his mother, who tries
to snap out of her possession, saying that “I know you don’t love me but I love
you.” Which, after nearly strangling the boy, causes Amelia to snap out of it.
But the fight with the monster isn’t over; Amelia is forced to confront the
Babadook face to face, which reignites her maternal instincts, screaming at the
Babadook at the top of her lungs. She refuses to let the Babadook take her son,
which also means she refuses to let her sadness and depression overcome her
again. The Babadook itself isn’t defeated by violence but by a mother’s will to
protect her son and will recover from the tragedy she faced some time ago.

 

What
cements the Babadook as more of a metaphor for her feelings and depression that
as a monster that just spawned into existence is the fact that at the end of
the film, The Babadook isn’t gone. It doesn’t explode and dies, Amelia is seen
feeding it. The beast itself couldn’t be killed, but it’s always there, lurking
in the shadows, but as long as Amelia recognises that she has a problem, she
will remain healthy and be able to provide for her son. It’s just a matter of
keeping it fed.